Samsung T1 Portable SSD Review (1TB) – Price, Speed, Capacity and Security

COMPONENTS AND DISASSEMBLY

Perhaps the most valuable piece of advise we can offer if you are considering disassembly of the T1 is …DON’T DO IT!  Personally, I love taking things apart and have been doing it for years and, given this love of ripping things apart, it is only natural that things sometimes just don’t go right, especially with Samsung SSDs.  We don’t need to speak of a certain 840 Pro where the pentalobe screw didn’t want to cooperate, resulting in my punching a hole clear through that SSD.

The Samsung Portable SSD T1 is comprised of five pieces, three being the plastic exterior, a mSATA to USB3.0 bridge, and a Samsung 850 EVO 1TB mSATA SSD.

Samsung Portable SSD T1 Disassembled

The exterior plastic case is secured by clips of which there is no easy way to get them apart, short of a great deal of frustration.

Samsung 850 EVO mSATA SSD Front

The SSD itself consists of a green printed circuit board, a low power 2-core MGX controller (S4LN062X01-Y030), four pieces of Samsung 3D V-NAND flash memory with a product number of K9DMGB8S7C, and a Samsung DRAM cache memory chip.

Samsung 850 EVO mSATA SSD Back

Last but not least, we have the mSATA to USB3.0 adapter which contains the ASMedia 1153e USB3.0 controller with UASP support.

Samsung Portable SSD T1 USB3 BridgeThe external connector itself on the Portable SSD T1 is a USB 3.0 micro connector. To the right of that is a small light that displays a blue LED during disk activity.

Samsung Portable SSD T1 USB 3 Connector

Now, looking back at my improvised Samsung 1TB external SSD that was created some time ago, we can see that things are surprisingly very similar in build; this original design being a MyDigitalSSD OTG case housing the Samsung 1TB 840 pro mSATA SSD.

 

Samsung 1TB Improvised External SSD

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David Bell
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David Bell

If only it was the new USB 3.1 🙂 Damn that would be awesome!

Wily
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Wily

David you are right. Time is over for the 3.0. Too late for these devices. 3.0 was announced in 2008 and they offered 10 MB write 40 MB read drives for years. Still more than half of the 3.0 drives are 10 – 15 MB write 70 – 80 MB read. 3.1 was announced in 2014 and when 3.0 died producers started to offer 400 MB drives. Patriot renewed Supersonic Magnum series with 300 MB write 400 MB read speed. Corsair renewed Voyager GS and GTX. Lexar renewed P10 to P20 with 270 MB write 400 MB read. I do… Read more »

dravo1
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dravo1

It would be interesting on these portable SSDs to do real stress testing to see what kind of speed drops occur during heavy write IO. I know with some high-end USB thumb drives heat is a real problem during heavy write IOs that result in the USB throughput dropping.

lorki
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lorki

why the use of mgx controller instead of mex which is being used in 850evo 1tb model?

Do all the msata 1tb models use the mgx controller?

Aida Surugan
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I was hoping for a 70 dollar terabyte one lol

Robert LC Retoucher DigitalArt
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Robert LC Retoucher DigitalArt

Hoping or dreaming 😛

?The Fun Shinon [Elite Ten] ?
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Why not both?
😀

Robert LC Retoucher DigitalArt
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Robert LC Retoucher DigitalArt

Haha, well, even most HDD’s aren’t at that price range, let alone regular SSD’s so expecting (correction, “hoping” 😉 that from a portable UASP SSD is a bit…too optimistic.

Don’t buy it anyways (IMO), as it’s not performing that well compared to even regular SSD’s (which you can put in a case and with an adapter you can achieve the same external portability).

Little patience and we’re going to see more and better of these coming up 🙂

?The Fun Shinon [Elite Ten] ?
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You’re right.
Upvote for you!

xgrep
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xgrep

Just curious … how does this compare with the Freecom mSSD (which I note is not mentioned or reviewed on this website, perhaps because they didn’t wish to sponsor the site?)? I measured the mSSD back in September and it showed very favorably compared to this Samsung device (I used Xbench, so not the identical test conditions). It’s also a lot smaller. But (1) it’s quite expensive (over US$300), (2) only 256MB, and (3) doesn’t have any on-board security (but, for reasons I can’t determine, it performs nearly as fast under Apple’s CoreStorage encrypted volume as it does native).

Les@TheSSDReview
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What we review and our review of that product has NOTHING to do with advertising and all who are familiar with the site understand that the reviewers opinion stands here.

I have never even heard of the Freecom mSSD but you are more than welcome to get them to send one along for review if you like.

xgrep
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xgrep

Thank you, I will write to them to suggest that. As probably the premier website devoted to SSD topics, I hope that TheSSDReview will interest them enough to send a review sample or two.

fairdinkum
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fairdinkum

You’ve never heard of FreeCom??? What sort of reviewer are you then? How lazy of you to ask a viewer to get a company to send you a sample. DO IT YOURSELF. THAT’S YOUR JOB.