Kingston Announces HyperX Fury & 960GB SSDs – Computex 2014 Update

Kingston today announced a new SSD in the HyperX line that has branded as Fury.  It is a 2.5″ notebook SSD, equipped with the LSI SandForce SF-2281 controller and IMFT L85 memory.

Kingston HyperX M.2 SSD - 15

The HyperX Fury will be marketed as a 240GB SSD at this point and time and pricing is expected to be very competitive.

Kingston HyperX M.2 SSD - 01

In addition, Kingston will be releasing the SSDNow 310 in an effort to appease to those seeking higher capacity SSDs as it is a 960GB SSD.

Kingston HyperX M.2 SSD - 14

Performance displayed was that of 536MB/s read and 485MB/s write speeds.

Kingston HyperX M.2 SSD - 08

 

19 comments

  1. With all the controllers out there, it’s really funny to see manufactures releasing drives based on sandforce 🙂

  2. The FURY looks to basically be a rebadged version of the synch/SF-2281 V300 that they originally released and should have been providing in the first place if not for their shady business practices.

  3. What shady practices? The drive meets their published specs. Doesn’t sound shady to me.

    • Benjamin Hojnik

      Look around with what they did with V300. First they released version with toshiba toggle NAND, which all of the reviewers tested. Then, some time later, they silently switched the nand to a much slower async micron nand. Reduction in speeds was almost two fold. And all this with no pruduct change (still V300).

      With practices like that, i don’t think ill ever buy anything from them.

      • You avoided the response completely. Simple question: does the drive meet the specs?
        If the drive meets the specs, then your argument of using different flash (which non-NAND manufacturers would likely have to do for inventory management) is non-valid. I buy a car that says made in USA. Sometimes the parts in the car come from Korea, or from China. If it meets the spec, then there’s not much to complain about is there?

      • Benjamin Hojnik

        Yeah, but the issue is, that although it meats it’s “specs”, they are meaningless, because they only apply to highly compressible data.So in theory, they could use the lowest grade flash there is and it would still meet its speecs (because drive isn’t really writing anything).
        So yeah, while there legaly isn’t an issue (it still meets its specs) but its moraly very wrong, since you’re buying a much slower drive that it originally suppost to be (according to reviews anyway). i mean, reduction in speeds is two fold. Thats kinda bad.

      • Yeah but I haven’t read anywhere that the v300 is a performance SSD, especially when you look at it’s price relative to other drives in the same price range. Is there a price difference between HyperX and v300? Newegg shows there is. Is there a performance difference between the two? Their specs say there are. So what you seem to have a problem with, for “shady practices”, is that a company changed flash and on a particular benchmark showed less performance (but still met their specs). You seem to not complain that you have bought an SSD that performed better than it’s specs. You seem to not complain that you paid for an entry level SSD that performs pretty well.

        And incompressible data, I fail to see how that argument applies. I would guess almost everyone who buys an entry level SSD is upgrading an HDD in their system. Most of us “regular users” do not read and write 100% incompressible data across the span of the entire drive several times a day. In general I would save a couple MP3s, edit a few jpgs, watch some movies on youtube, surf the web, and play hearthstone or Starcraft II and pow I’m done for the day. I bet most consumers out there are just like me. What benchmark does that fill? The benchmarks I see on reviewer sites are showing you extreme corner cases that are realistically not applicable to consumer use case. The drive is faster than an HDD. My system boots in seconds. The only noise I hear is system CPU fan. The 2.5″ drive does not take up the 3.5″ drive bay so I am assuming I’m getting better airflow in my system. I’m happy with my v300. I’m happy with the price I paid for it.

      • If you’re happy with it (there is a good chance you have the old toshiba version) that doesn’t mean everyone should support such practice. And v300 isn’t really relavent anymore, because its much more expensive than competing drives (namely crucial) and much much slower. There really is no reason to buy one, unless you’re getting it really cheaply or for free.

      • I have the Async version, I checked my FW version. Read the manufacturer’s specs for the drive, not some reviewer. And it’s obvious you know nothing about what happened with OCZ. Those guys got busted for using crappy reclaimed flash and poor quality control, not just switching from one new flash technology to another.

        Quantify “much more expensive”. I just did a comparison of the M500 versus the v300. 240GB vs 240GB. Kingston 104.99, Crucial 109.99.

        480 vs 480: $239 vs $232.

      • You should check the MX100, which is cheaper than m500 🙂

        And here in EU, crucial is by far the cheapest solution…

        >And it’s obvious you know nothing about what happened with OCZ. Those
        guys got busted for using crappy reclaimed flash and poor quality
        control, not just switching from one new flash technology to another.

        Well, it looks like you don’t known what really went down. They didnt use crappy reclaimed flash, but they switched from 34nm 32Gbit to 25nm 64Gbit. Same thing kingston did.
        Quality control has nothing to do with this, as its a seperate issue entirely.

      • “You should check the MX100”

        Newegg has the MX100 listed at $69.99 right now and the new HyperX Fury SHFS37A/120G just got listed for $79.99. Why would anyone go for the Fury? Oh right, all I have to do is peruse the V300 Amazon reviews to figure that out. Some people believe what they want to believe.

      • Yeah, fury really makes no sense (given the price). Its using almost 3 year old controller (that is in some way still flawed) and crappy flash.

        Unless you’re diehard kingston fan or you easily fall for fancy specs, then you won’t buy this at all.

      • I like Kingston stuff because I’ve had great experiences with their DIMMs and thumbdrives. That doesn’t make me a Kingston fanboy, I just like doing business with a company that takes care of it’s customers and seems to be a popular choice for SSDs. I did my research before I bought an SSD. The v300 line has a good balance of performance and price. I’m an entry level guy and not an extreme gamer, just wanted something to replace my slow HDD.

        And falling for fancy specs…. seems like you are falling for fancy benchmarks. Seems like everyone has a benchmark that shows their product as superior to others. Probably the same goes for specs.

        Aren’t all new drives using “crappier” flash? I would imagine that Micron, Toshiba, etc would be switching production lines over to support their new nodes and force guys to transition their products. I also read somewhere that as flash dies shrink, the quality of flash decreases.

        I am done talking on this subject. I don’t think Kingston is a shady company. They don’t have a history of being shady and the drive I bought meets their published specs (and exceeds a few of them). I feel like I got great value for my $$ and if I build a system for friends or family, I would likely go back to them again.

        Arguing in a forum is like pushing a boulder. No matter how hard you push, that boulder ain’t going anywhere.

      • ” I did my research before I bought an SSD. I did my research before I bought an SSD.”

        The thing about the V300 is that you can’t really be sure what you are going to get even after the research. Their tech support person Jewel who is making canned excuses on Amazon and Newegg daily will not state anything specifically but will only obfuscate by saying that they use “MLC NAND from various manufacturers.” I would love to hear about another manufacturer that currently does this because Kingston is the only one I have found.

      • Other manufactures atleast discontinue the product, if its flash is too expensive to manufacture and lanuch a new product, so you know what you get.

      • > Aren’t all new drives using “crappier” flash? I would imagine that
        Micron, Toshiba, etc would be switching production lines over to support
        their new nodes and force guys to transition their products. I also
        read somewhere that as flash dies shrink, the quality of flash
        decreases.

        No. While a lot of guys use 128Gbit flash (which is slower to its 64Gbit counterpart, since less dies can be use for a given capacity) almost no one is using async flash. Asycn flash is what makes V300 a crappy drive. It’s interface dates back to 05′, so you can imagine how slow that is (around 50MB/s per chanel, while others are doing 400MB/s). Thats the reason why it can only really do around 200MB/s of read, which is a joke, since everyone else at this price point has 550MB/s.
        And smaller die shrinks (16nm for example) does not make the drive crapier. While endurance does decrease, its still high enough for everyone buying such drive

        > The v300 line has a good balance of performance and price. I’m an entry
        level guy and not an extreme gamer, just wanted something to replace my
        slow HDD.

        Not, it doesn’t have a good balance. The new MX100 is what one can call a good balance of value, speed and capacity. v300 was good, when it came out (with toshiba flash) but right now it makes absolutly no sense, since there are better drives for the same price (or +/- 5$).

      • “Yeah but I haven’t read anywhere that the v300 is a performance…”

        Yeah but some us bought the earlier reviewed model that did indicate higher performance and based on that bought another one expecting the same product since it had the same SKU/name. I’m not happy with the second one. You might want to change “met their specs” to “met their selective spec”

      • lastly, do you hold Asus, Acer, Apple, Sony, HP, Dell, etc. accountable for usually sourcing 2-3 different SSD vendors for their products and not disclosing which brand is beneath the hood? is that shady too? Reviews showed performance differences between different drives in each platform. Switcheroo with no documentation! (Yet the drives meet their published specs.. hmmm)

      • Well, to be fair, they usually never publish actual specs (just look at the MBA) so it doesnt matter, since you know, youll either get a bad one or a good one. Not the case with v300

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