SanDisk Announces Availability Of 15nm Process Technology NAND Flash

SanDisk Corporation, a leading producer of flash storage products, is announcing availability of its latest 1Z-nanometer (nm) technology, providing the world’s most advanced process node to date.  The 15nm process node technology will be ramped up on both its two-bits-per-cell (X2) and its three-bits-per-cell (X3) architectures for NAND flash memory.  Volume production of the new 15nm process NAND is anticipated to begin in the second half of 2014.

SanDisk productsImage source:  Reuters

According to Dr. Siva Sivaram, senior vice president of memory technology at SanDisk, “We are thrilled to continue our technology leadership with the industry’s most advanced flash memory process node, enabling us to deliver the world’s smallest and most cost effective 128 gigabit chips.  We are delighted that these new chips will allow us to further differentiate and expand our portfolio of NAND flash solutions.”

The new 15nm technology features numerous advanced process innovations, and cell-designs that allow scaling of the chips along both axes.  SanDisk will be implementing its All-Bit-Line (ABL) architecture containing proprietary programming algorithms and multi-level storage management routines into the 1Z technology, which will create NAND flash products with no sacrifice in reliability or performance.

SanDisk_Headquarters_Milpitas

SanDisk intends to utilize the new 1Z process technology across its wide range of flash storage devices; from removable flash cards all the way up to enterprise SSDs.  The SanDisk press release announcing the new 15nm process technology can be viewed in its entirety here.

2
Leave a Reply

avatar
1 Comment threads
1 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
2 Comment authors
Benjamin HojnikZaxx Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Zaxx
Guest
Zaxx

Safe to assume they’re claiming the usual 3,000 P/E cycles then?

Benjamin Hojnik
Guest
Benjamin Hojnik

Thats a good question.
I’m guessing not.