Breaking News

Lite-On Announces MU-II Series of Solid State Drives Featuring Toshiba 15nm TLC NAND

Lite-On is announcing its MU-II series of solid-state drives (SSDs).  Built in a standard 2.5” x 7mm form factor, the MU-II series of SSDs operate via the SATA 6 Gb/s interface.  These drives feature Toshiba 15nm TLC NAND, enabling an extremely competitive price point.

LITEON MUII SSD angled mainThe MU-II series will be offered in capacities of 120GB, 240GB, 480GB and 960GB.  Sequential read speeds are stated as 555 MB/s for all capacities.  Sequential write speeds are stated as 500 MB/s for the 120GB & 240GB versions, and 520 MB/s for the 480GB and 960GB models.

LITEON MUII packageRandom 4K read speeds are stated as 330 MB/s  for the 120GB and 480GB models, 380 MB/s for the 480GB model, and 370 MB/s for the 960GB version.  Random 4K write speeds are stated as 220 MB/s (120GB), 250 MB/s (240GB), 360 MB/s (480GB), and 350 MB/s (960GB).

LITEON MUII SSD bannerLite-On’s MU-II series support the following command sets: TRIM (where supported by operating system), S.M.A.R.T. drive monitoring attributes, NCQ, and ATA/ATAPI-8.  Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF) is stated as 1.5 million hours, and Lite-On backs the MU-II series with a three-year limited warranty.

LITEON MUII SSD specsThe customized, proprietary firmware for the MU-II series was developed by Lite-On’s experienced in-house firmware team.  Pricing and availability have not yet been released.  For more information, you can view the MU-II series’ product page here.

Liteon logo

4
Leave a Reply

avatar
1 Comment threads
3 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
2 Comment authors
Benjamin HojnikBill Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Bill
Guest
Bill

Strange the 960 is slower that the 480 on Random read and write while have twice the cache.

Benjamin Hojnik
Guest
Benjamin Hojnik

Sometimes having to deal with twice the dies and pages has a toll on performance.
Btw more cache on its own doesn’t help performance, because only mapping tables are stored there

Bill
Guest
Bill

I noticed that most SSD get faster the larger the drive is.

Benjamin Hojnik
Guest
Benjamin Hojnik

Only to a certain point.