Samsung 840 EVO SSD Review – Samsung Caches In On Value and Performance

 ATTO DISK BENCHMARK VER. 2.46

ATTO Disk Benchmark is perhaps one of the oldest benchmarks going and is definitely the main staple for manufacturer performance specifications. ATTO uses RAW or compressible data and, for our benchmarks, we use a set length of 256mb and test both the read and write performance of various transfer sizes ranging from 0.5 to 8192kb. Manufacturers prefer this method of testing as it deals with raw (compressible) data rather than random (includes incompressible data) which, although more realistic, results in lower performance results.

Samsung 840 EVO 1TB SSD ATTO

ATTO high results of 555MB/s read and 535MB/s write are excellent considering that we are conducting first tests of a new NAND flash memory footprint and it is triple level cell.  Our ATTO results in both standard system, and optimized were identical, negating the necessity of posting both results.

CRYSTAL DISK BENCHMARK VER. 3.0 X64

Crystal Disk Benchmark is used to measure read and write performance through sampling of raw (0/1 Fill/compressible) or random data which is, for the most part, incompressible. In the Samsung 840 EVO SSD, performance results are very similar whether we test with compressible or incompressible data and, for this reason, results are displayed utilizing incompressible data.  Our results reflect standard testing on the left while those on the right are the result of CPU ‘C’ State optimization as described in The SSD Optimization Guide:

Samsung 840 EVO 1TB SSD CDMCPU Optimized Samsung 840 EVO 1TB SSD CDMThe optimized PC (right) clearly reflects an obvious performance boost with respect to low 4K random write performance.  Low 4K random write performance has been traditionally the Achilles heel in SSD progression as we have seen massive speed improvements at all other levels of disk access, yet the 4K read and writes remain right around that 100MB/s mark.

AS SSD BENCHMARK VER 1.6

Up until recently, AS SSD was the only benchmark created specifically for SSD testing and it uses incompressible data. AS SSD, for the most part, gives us the ‘worst case scenario’ in SSD transfer speeds because of its use of incompressible data and many enthusiasts like to AS SSD for their needs. Once again, we will display the standard system on the left with optimized on the right:

Samsung 840 EVO 1TB SSD AS SSD BenchCPU Optimized Samsung 840 EVO 1TB SSD AS SSD BenchTaking a look at AS SSD IOPS as well, both SSDs display very impressive performance, regardless of whether it is a standard system or one that has been optimized:

Samsung 840 EVO 1TB SSD AS SSD IOPSCPU Optimized Samsung 840 EVO 1TB SSD AS SSD IOPSIOPS results of just under 100K seem to be the standard these days. Regardless, the Samsung EVO 840 provides some incredible results on the AS SSD Copy Benchmark:

Samsung 840 EVO 1TB SSD AS SSD Copy BenchmarkCPU Optimized Samsung 840 EVO 1TB SSD AS SSD Copy BenchmarkIt’s not often that we ever see +400MB/s speeds in the AS SSD Copy Bench

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KC
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KC

super fast review – love ie

Rod Bland
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Rod Bland

Great review Les. This drive is probably the most exciting development in the consumer SSD space to date. We can’t wait to get our hands on these down under in Australia.

Eric
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Eric

Seems like a great SATA3 drive. However, I can’t help but feel like it’s a “bridge” drive. I mean, NGFF m.2 drives with direct PCIe connection are starting to appear, and they should have over 1GB/s read/write without any RAPID technology involved. This drive is for current systems that use a SATA port (99.999% of the market), but direct PCIe connection is the better way to go.

Les@TheSSDReview
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Wow….this could be a long response. You are absolutely right when you say that PCIe will be the future. It will take a few years, if not longer to completely implement, however, and manufacturers have already stated that it will have OEM, and not, retail availability initially. This makes great sense as there just isn’t the need for PCIe just yet. Samsung is striking at the present and want to get those that are yet to migrate, which is the majority of the population. The biggest obstacle with SSD transition has always been lack of knowledge and then fear of… Read more »

iCrunch
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iCrunch

Agreed. However, for those of us regularly visiting this site, I think we are mostly looking for the latest and the greatest, which the EVO certainly represents, except for the SATA III bottleneck. Just like with 4G LTE data speeds being discussed in terms of “fast enough for most people”, and the same being the case as far as prowess of CPUs are concerned, we still want PCIe now instead of later. Mid-2013 MacBook Air owners are already there with Samsung again leading the way. Of course, there is also the issue of where would we plug in a PCIe… Read more »

Les@TheSSDReview
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There will be no 840 Evo Pro, but rather a future release of Samsung Magician with RAPID for the present Samsung Pro. Samsung is very happy with where they are at with the 840 Pro.

iCrunch
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iCrunch

OK, so the 840 EVO replaces the 840 and then there’s the 840 Pro that remains, is that about right? Thanks so much for quick responses, Les. I need to choose a new SSD to buy either today or tomorrow, so I guess I can still buy the 840 Pro and get (most? all?) of the benefits of the EVO just with a software update?

Thanks again, you rule! (but you knew that… ;-P)

Patosan
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Patosan

Will the Samsung Magician update for the 840 Pro ALSO help the 840 ?

Les@TheSSDReview
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You will have to clarify this a bit more.

Kevin
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Kevin

Great and timely coverage. Thanks!

dravo1
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dravo1

Am I the only one who believes that all SSDs (enterprise, prosumer and consumer) should have the supercaps installed?? The threat of data loss caused by a power interruption is rather nasty regardless of the users classification. I had hoped the EVOs would address this once and for all. With onboard memory caches getting larger and larger the potential for substantial data loss/corruption grows as well. It’s time for vendors to stop using supercaps as a marketing gimmick.

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