Wednesday , 22 October 2014
Learn What SSDs Can Do For You:

Mach Xtreme DIY Series SATA-DOM 32GB SSD Review – Small O/S Storage In Postage Stamp-Sized Form Factor

The continuing evolution of flash storage is producing a variety of new form factors, often trending towards ever-smaller devices.  One of the smallest we have encountered yet is the DOM (disk-on-module) form factor.  A SATA-DOM is a DOM with a standard SATA data connection incorporated, such as the DIY series of SATA-DOM SSDs from Mach Xtreme Technology, with a footprint barely the length and width of a postage stamp.

SATADOM on angled box 429AA

INTRODUCTION

Today’s review is of the Mach Xtreme DIY series 32GB (MLC) SATA-DOM, a SATA II (3.0GB/s) miniaturized SSD designed for high-read, low-write usage scenarios that only require a small operating system; such as NAS enclosures, routers, set-top boxes, point-of-sale devices, hand-held devices, gaming machines, etc.

Mach Xtreme Technology is a Taiwanese producer of high-performance solid state storage products for both industrial applications and for power users.  Mach Xtreme has a strong presence in the European markets, but has yet to gain a significant foothold in North America.  That could easily change with a unique offering such as the DIY series of SATA-DOMs.

SATADOM size comparison 429A

To give you a perspective on just how small the Mach Xtreme SATA-DOM SSD is, the above image shows the SATA-DOM sitting atop a standard 3.5″ Western Digital 1TB HDD.

PACKAGE AND CONTENTS

Our Mach Xtreme SATA-DOM SSD arrived from Taiwan in a cardboard-colored package with black graphics.  A round “shield” on the front center designates this as a “DIY Edition” above crossed screwdrivers, with the capacity of 32GB designated below.  Opening the box reveals a sealed anti-static bag containing the SATA-DOM SSD itself and the power harness.  This is all that is needed to make this little SSD fully functional.  No SATA data cable is needed as the drive plugs right into a SATA port.

SATADOM box and contents 429A

MACH XTREME SATA-DOM 32GB

SATADOM top side 429AA

Mach Xtreme’s SATA-DOM offers robust performance for a SATA II (3.0 GB/s) device, low power consumption, and highly intelligent block management and wear-leveling to extend endurance.  The Mach Xtreme SATA-DOM is available in several configurations:  either horizontal or vertical orientations, either SLC or MLC NAND flash memory, and capacity points of 4GB, 8GB, 16GB, 32GB and 64GB.

SATADOM and power connector 429A

Our 32GB review sample is the MLC version and is rated for sequential read speeds of up to 220 MB/s, and sequential writes  of up to 45 MB/s.  Mean time between failures is stated as being in excess of 2,500,000 hours.  Mach Xtreme is backing the DIY series of (MLC) SATA-DOMs with a two-year warranty.

SATADOM underside 429A

The continuing evolution of flash storage is producing a variety of new form factors, often trending towards ever-smaller devices.  One of the smallest we have encountered yet is the DOM (disk-on-module) form factor.  A SATA-DOM is a DOM with a standard SATA data connection incorporated, such as the DIY series of SATA-DOM SSDs from Mach Xtreme Technology, with a footprint barely the length and width of a postage stamp. INTRODUCTION Today's review is of the Mach Xtreme DIY series 32GB (MLC) SATA-DOM, a SATA II (3.0GB/s) miniaturized SSD designed for high-read, low-write usage scenarios that only require a small operating system;…

Review Overview

Build and components
Performance
Features
Price & Availability
Warranty

Summary : Unique miniature SSD that can serve as either or boot drive or secondary storage drive. Simple to install and utilize.

User Rating: Be the first one !
70

About Scot Strong

Scot Strong is an automotive parts professional with 30 years experience in proprietary dealership computer systems, He is also a technology freak the rest of the time. He has been repairing, upgrading, and building personal and business computers for over ten years. He has also written articles for automotive parts management publications, and is a regular contributor at our sister site, TechnologyX.com
  • Benjamin Hojnik

    Yikes!!
    That random write is really really bad. Like jmicron 602 bad. Can’t imagine how this thing would stutter if OS was installed in there. A proper controller would fix that easily..

    But i guess this is meant more for caching and READ only enviroments (POS systems?)…

    • renosablast

      Bear in mind that this is only a SATAII device. Most of the newer controller technology and NAND improvements are going into SATAIII devices.

      • Benjamin Hojnik

        True, but there are far far better SATAII controllers (like sandforce 1st gen) that have no issues with random speeds.

        But again, this is a very simple controller and hence random speeds suffer.

Footer 930x64
SSD QUICK SEARCH