Intel 750 PCIe SSD Review (1.2TB) – 1st Consumer 2.4GB/s NVMe SSD Set To Change The Industry

REPORT ANALYSIS AND FINAL THOUGHTS

The Intel 750 series is a storage enthusiast’s dream come true and a penny savers nightmare, but who cares about those penny savers anyways? They have a wide variety of entry level SSD storage to choose from. The storage enthusiasts are the ones that really matter here. We want fast, faster than fast, and we want it yesterday! Well, the Intel 750 series is not only fast, it is a great value when looking at this segment of the market. For under $1 per GB you get a lot of bang for your buck. For SSDs such as this we like to say “just shut up and take my money!”

Intel 750 1.2TB AngledIntel is a bit like Mercedes Benz when it comes to the SSD market. With Mercedes their engine power ratings are usually on the more conservative side and often times they push out more power than the specs list. This goes the same for Intel, while they state that this beast of an SSD is rated for up to 2.4GB/s read and 440K IOPS we were able to achieve much higher speeds at nearly 2.7GB/s read and over 460K random read IOPS! During PCMark Vantage it achieved an all-time high score of 338K points! This is very impressive as the last highest score we’ve seen in this benchmark was less than half that!  In PCMark 8 we could see an apparent performance increase due to the PCIe and NVMe interface in terms of bandwidth and latency over some of the popular high-end SSD options in the market. Furthermore, during tested we found it pointless to do any type of temperature vs throughput testing as when put under our Iometer write workload for 1hr the PCB and heat sink were barely warm to the touch.

Overall, the Intel 750 series has a lot going for it. It is the first SSD to bring NVMe to consumer hands, as well as Intel’s first PCIe Gen3 x4 SSD for the client enthusiast and workstation market. We’ve seen it deliver great performance. It is available in capacities of 400GB and 1.2TB and two form factors, a 2.5″ form factor with a SFF-8639 connector as well as the HHHL add-in card form factor we tested today. It can be used as bootable storage. It utilizes NVMe for better performance and efficiency. It comes with support from Intel’s Toolbox. It is backed by a 5 year warranty and best of all it comes in at a great price point. It seems like this is the perfect SSD for the enthusiast, right?

Intel 750 1.2TB Detail

Now the cons. “Wait, there are cons? How can there be cons to something as magnificent as this?” Well yeah, just some because we had to be really picky. The main one we could think of is its endurance rating. Yes, 219TB written is quite a lot for a consumer SSD, however, this is a class leading enthusiast/workstation product. While not providing similar performance, we have seen a few SATA and M.2 SSDs with endurance ratings that dominate the Intel 750’s. Then when you think of the ratings that its P3000 series brothers have it is a bit of a letdown, however, if you do want more endurance simply step up to one of their enterprise class products. Furthermore, another con would be that this SSD is not available in an 800GB capacity as the gap between 400GB and 1.2TB is quite large and we are pretty sure that many would opt for the 800GB model if they could. Our final con is a very minor one, it is that this SSD is not bootable in legacy systems. This SSD requires UEFIs that are 2.3.1 or later, however, if you are in the market for something such as this you are going to pretty much have the latest and greatest of everything anyways. Besides that, we don’t have any more gripes with the Intel 750 given its market position.

Quite frankly the Intel 750 series is a game changer. Without using a complicated RAID type configuration the Intel 750 series delivers enthusiast class leading performance and Intel’s legendary reliability at under $1 per GB. If you are looking for very high performance at a very decent price, this SSD blows its competition out of the water. Without further ado, we would like to award the Intel 750 our Editor’s Choice award due to its value/performance ratio!

Check out the Intel 750 series on Amazon today!

Editors Choice-SSD copy Opt

Review Overview

Build and Components
SSD Performance
Price and Availability
Features
Warranty

NVMe in Consumer Hands

A storage enthusiast's dream come true. Intel is providing us near enterprise class storage for under $1 per GB. The Intel 750 series is not only a fast PCIe SSD, reaching near 2.7GB/s read and 1.3GB/s write during our testing, but it the first consumer PCIe NVMe SSD on the market and it sure is going to disturb the peace with it's value.

User Rating: 3.63 ( 23 votes)

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Obsidian71
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Obsidian71

You guys are replacing my keyboard. I just drooled all over it

Sean Webster
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Haha, time for one of those water proof ones! Trust me, I found myself drooling uncontrollably after first receiving this SSD as well! I think that I even forgot how to speak for a bit.

darpa21214
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darpa21214

Is it true that in the real world a user will notice no difference between an Intel 750 and a Samsung 850 pro or any other SSD for that mater?

Sean Webster
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It depends on what your real world use is. Everyone has different workloads. If you are editing media heavily such as video and 4K video for that matter, yes there is a difference. If you are just a power user who does a lot of typical desktop tasks you are better off with a SATA SSD.

darpa21214
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darpa21214

So for a person with an overclocked 5820K, 16gb of ram, four 4 TB HDs full of movies, who plays games and reads the internet, a 400gb 750 would be a waste of $150 over a Samsung 850 pro 512gb? or should I just blow the $150? I am not the price sensitive.

Les@TheSSDReview
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Well…if you are one who likes the best and the fastest (evident by the OC), you might just have to have the 750 but, for what you describe, there will be no performance difference from the other SSD. Not being price sensitive, I’de be grabbing the 750 personally though…just sayin’.

Dash
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Dash

It’s not going to help you with movies or surfing the web if you’re already running on SSD. It will benefit game loading times, but probably not by a noticeable amount.

Also, a word of warning on the 5820K, it’s been crippled to only have 28 PCIe lanes. Which means if you’re ever thinking of Crossfire/SLI on your graphics card then may start running out of lanes.

If you’re looking for a sensible decision, this isn’t it – but then, Haswell-E is probably not that sane either (I’ve got one, so I’m with you on that).

John Curtis
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John Curtis

So my revodrive 3 x2 failed a few days ago and I was eyeing the p3700 but its a bit pricey. Is there a good reason not to consider this thing now?

Sean Webster
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Up to you and your uses. The P3600 is rated for faster reads and writes, but a bit lower random writes. Then if you look at the endurance rating the P3600 is rated for 3 drive writes per day up to nearly 11PB TBW…not 219TB TBW. So the P3600 annihilates it in endurance if you need that for your workflow.

John Curtis
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John Curtis

Its a solid point on the endurance. Its for a workstation so I might trade in this case I might favor the p3600 but it’s pretty amazing that tech has gotten to the point where this is even a decision.

Thanks for the note and great input as always!

Sean Webster
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No problem, good luck with your decision!

Technostica
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Technostica

If you actually are running workstation loads then this might be useful otherwise judging by the real world benchmarks I’ve seen elsewhere this is a waste of money.

Sean Webster
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Yep, thus why it is targeted towards that market.

ShawnF
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ShawnF

The 2.5-inch form factor model interests me. It says it ships with an add-on card? Is the SSD tethered to this card or can we use other SAS/Sata Express cards from LSI to power this thing?

Sean Webster
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It comes with a SFF-8639 to SF-8643 cable. It is only compatible with a PCIe adapter of some sort such as an M.2 to SFF-8643. Currently the only supported motherboard for this SSD is the Asus X99 Sabertooth as it comes with an M.2 to SFF-8643 adapter. It will not work with SAS cards.

Guts
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Guts

Hi, can anyone help to verify how fast was the boot up timing as I get a wide range of result for the boot up timing.

Techreport review claim 51 sec boot up which is slowest in all SSD and TT also claim that 750 is noticeable slower, yet the review here mentioned single digit boot up.

Just how fast? Any software to keep the exact timing?

Sean Webster
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I had 9 seconds boot in the Z97 test system from power off to on after optimizing everything.

Guts
Guest
Guts

Hmmm so is about as fast as SATA drive, but just not much faster?

Sean Webster
Guest

Yeah, just about the same. The Samsung 850 Pro 128GB I have as the OS Drive normally boots from power off to desktop in about 8-10 seconds…even a bunch of other SSDs I’ve tested boot about the same.

Guts
Guest
Guts

Well then, I guess this drive need some firmware update to really boost up the boost speed. Probably better future bios update as well.

Dash
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Dash

I suspect most of the delay in boot these days with SSD are BIOS/UEFI initialisations and or driver issues with Windows. All of which could vary from system to system.