Intel 750 PCIe SSD Review (1.2TB) – 1st Consumer 2.4GB/s NVMe SSD Set To Change The Industry

TSSDR TEST BENCH AND PROTOCOL

SSD testing at TSSDR differs slightly, depending on whether we are looking at consumer or enterprise SSDs.  For consumer SSDs, our goal is to test in a system that has been optimized with our SSD Optimization Guide. To see the best performance possible the CPU C states have been disabled, C1E support has been disabled, Enhanced Intel SpeedStep Technology (EIST) has been disabled. Benchmarks for consumer testing are also benchmarks with a fresh drive so, not only can we verify that manufacturer specifications are in line but also, so the consumer can replicate our tests to confirm that they have an SSD that is top-notch.  We even provide links to most of the benchmarks used in the report.

While this SSD is simply plug and play, for testing we are utilizing Intel’s NVMe driver to ensure the best performance possible.

Sean Consumer Test Bench Core V51

SYSTEM COMPONENTS

This Test Bench build was the result of some great relationships and purchase; our appreciation goes to those who jumped in specifically to help the cause.  Key contributors to this build are our friends at ASRock for the motherboard and CPU and be quiet! for the PSU and cooling fans. Also, a big thank you to Thermaltake for the case and Kingston for the RAM. We have detailed all components in the table below and they are all linked should you wish to make a duplicate of our system as so many seem to do, or check out the price of any single component.  As always, we appreciate your support in any purchase through our links!

PC CHASSIS: Thermaltake Core V51
MOTHERBOARD: ASRock Z97 Extreme6
CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K
CPU COOLER: Corsair H75
POWER SUPPLY: be quiet! Dark Power Pro 10 850W
SYSTEM COOLING: be quiet! Silent Wings 2
MEMORY: Kingston HyperX Beast 2400Mhz
STORAGE: Samsung 850 Pro

BENCHMARK SOFTWARE

The software in use for today’s analysis is typical of many of our reviews and consists of TRIMcheck, Intel Toolbox, ATTO Disk Benchmark, Crystal Disk Mark, AS SSD, Anvil’s Storage Utilities, PCMark 8, and PCMark Vantage. We prefer to test with easily accessible software that the consumer can obtain, and in many cases, we even provide links. Our selection of software allows each to build on the last and to provide validation to results already obtained.

S.M.A.R.T. DATA

Normally we would show you a screenshot of the S.M.A.R.T. data using Crystal Disk Info here, however this SSD does not show up when using this program. Instead, we are using Intel’s Toolbox to show off the S.M.A.R.T data.

Intel 750 1.2TB NVMe S.M.A.R.T. Data

TRIMCHECK

We’ve covered TRIMcheck in the past. It is a great tool that easily lets us see if TRIM is actually functioning on a SSD volume in your system.

Intel 750 Series TRIM

Since Intel states that this SSD supports it, we wanted to see if TRIM was functioning or not. As it seems, TRIMcheck came back with positive results just as we had expected.

ATTO DISK BENCHMARK VER. 2.47

ATTO Disk Benchmark is perhaps one of the oldest benchmarks going and is definitely the main staple for manufacturer performance specifications. ATTO uses RAW or compressible data and, for our benchmarks, we use a set length of 256mb and test both the read and write performance of various transfer sizes ranging from 0.5 to 8192kb. Manufacturers prefer this method of testing as it deals with raw (compressible) data rather than random (includes incompressible data) which, although more realistic, results in lower performance results.

Intel 750 1.2TB NVMe ATTO

Starting off with ATTO we can see some interesting performance numbers. First off, we are quite impressed that it surpasses the rated specs of 2.4GB/s read and 1.2GB/s write, reaching nearly 2.7GB/s read and over 1.3GB/s write! Overall, the performance pattern is very similar to that of the Intel DC P3700. Write speeds increase rapidly and reads increase gradually with increasing file sizes. Once the Intel 750 hits 16KB data it is already at its rated write spec and once it reaches the 1MB data it surpasses its sequential read spec.

40
Leave a Reply

avatar
16 Comment threads
24 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
23 Comment authors
Oddbjørn KvalsundstephenkamenarHad Enough With the BSChad CapelandNVMe_Fan Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Obsidian71
Guest
Obsidian71

You guys are replacing my keyboard. I just drooled all over it

Sean Webster
Guest

Haha, time for one of those water proof ones! Trust me, I found myself drooling uncontrollably after first receiving this SSD as well! I think that I even forgot how to speak for a bit.

darpa21214
Guest
darpa21214

Is it true that in the real world a user will notice no difference between an Intel 750 and a Samsung 850 pro or any other SSD for that mater?

Sean Webster
Guest

It depends on what your real world use is. Everyone has different workloads. If you are editing media heavily such as video and 4K video for that matter, yes there is a difference. If you are just a power user who does a lot of typical desktop tasks you are better off with a SATA SSD.

darpa21214
Guest
darpa21214

So for a person with an overclocked 5820K, 16gb of ram, four 4 TB HDs full of movies, who plays games and reads the internet, a 400gb 750 would be a waste of $150 over a Samsung 850 pro 512gb? or should I just blow the $150? I am not the price sensitive.

Les@TheSSDReview
Guest

Well…if you are one who likes the best and the fastest (evident by the OC), you might just have to have the 750 but, for what you describe, there will be no performance difference from the other SSD. Not being price sensitive, I’de be grabbing the 750 personally though…just sayin’.

Dash
Guest
Dash

It’s not going to help you with movies or surfing the web if you’re already running on SSD. It will benefit game loading times, but probably not by a noticeable amount.

Also, a word of warning on the 5820K, it’s been crippled to only have 28 PCIe lanes. Which means if you’re ever thinking of Crossfire/SLI on your graphics card then may start running out of lanes.

If you’re looking for a sensible decision, this isn’t it – but then, Haswell-E is probably not that sane either (I’ve got one, so I’m with you on that).

John Curtis
Guest
John Curtis

So my revodrive 3 x2 failed a few days ago and I was eyeing the p3700 but its a bit pricey. Is there a good reason not to consider this thing now?

Sean Webster
Guest

Up to you and your uses. The P3600 is rated for faster reads and writes, but a bit lower random writes. Then if you look at the endurance rating the P3600 is rated for 3 drive writes per day up to nearly 11PB TBW…not 219TB TBW. So the P3600 annihilates it in endurance if you need that for your workflow.

John Curtis
Guest
John Curtis

Its a solid point on the endurance. Its for a workstation so I might trade in this case I might favor the p3600 but it’s pretty amazing that tech has gotten to the point where this is even a decision.

Thanks for the note and great input as always!

Sean Webster
Guest

No problem, good luck with your decision!

Technostica
Guest
Technostica

If you actually are running workstation loads then this might be useful otherwise judging by the real world benchmarks I’ve seen elsewhere this is a waste of money.

Sean Webster
Guest

Yep, thus why it is targeted towards that market.

ShawnF
Guest
ShawnF

The 2.5-inch form factor model interests me. It says it ships with an add-on card? Is the SSD tethered to this card or can we use other SAS/Sata Express cards from LSI to power this thing?

Sean Webster
Guest

It comes with a SFF-8639 to SF-8643 cable. It is only compatible with a PCIe adapter of some sort such as an M.2 to SFF-8643. Currently the only supported motherboard for this SSD is the Asus X99 Sabertooth as it comes with an M.2 to SFF-8643 adapter. It will not work with SAS cards.

Guts
Guest
Guts

Hi, can anyone help to verify how fast was the boot up timing as I get a wide range of result for the boot up timing.

Techreport review claim 51 sec boot up which is slowest in all SSD and TT also claim that 750 is noticeable slower, yet the review here mentioned single digit boot up.

Just how fast? Any software to keep the exact timing?

Sean Webster
Guest

I had 9 seconds boot in the Z97 test system from power off to on after optimizing everything.

Guts
Guest
Guts

Hmmm so is about as fast as SATA drive, but just not much faster?

Sean Webster
Guest

Yeah, just about the same. The Samsung 850 Pro 128GB I have as the OS Drive normally boots from power off to desktop in about 8-10 seconds…even a bunch of other SSDs I’ve tested boot about the same.

Guts
Guest
Guts

Well then, I guess this drive need some firmware update to really boost up the boost speed. Probably better future bios update as well.

Dash
Guest
Dash

I suspect most of the delay in boot these days with SSD are BIOS/UEFI initialisations and or driver issues with Windows. All of which could vary from system to system.

SSD QUICK SEARCH