Hibernation - turn off - why? (except for capacity)

Discussion in 'SSD Beginners Guide and Discussion' started by tsw62, Jan 17, 2015.

  1. tsw62

    tsw62 New Member

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    Up front, I am a newbie here.
    Also I don't have a SSD yet, but will have purchase a SSD shortly.
    (Samsung 850 Pro 1TB)

    The SSD Optimization Guide tells me to turn off the Hibernation.
    The guide gives a bit of background for all the other optimization elements (System Protection, Pagefile, etc.)
    but only tells me how to turn off hibernation, for capacity reasons.

    A brief search for hibernation on Internation mostly are about turning it off.
    Only a few explain the use of it. Wikipedia, for example, explains the use of it.

    I wonder: if SSD space isn't really an issue, does it then serves any purpose to turn it off, considering the
    'advantage' when it is turned on?

    Thanks
    -
     
  2. RebeccaRx

    RebeccaRx New Member

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    SSD's have a limitation with regard to the number of write cycles (writes), usually around 3 years or longer. Well if you can afford to buy a new ssd drive, everytime it fails due to it reaching the base number of writes, then hibernation shouldn't really be an issue.

    I think the guide is mainly focusing on the fact of prolonging the life of your SSD. I don't know if there are other optimization benefits aside from that. I think the guide is very helpful, and it covers the most basic areas for optimizing an SSD. I'd give the mods pizza for it, if I can. Lol
     
  3. renosablast

    renosablast Moderator Staff Member

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    Hibernation for an HDD is primarily about power savings. SSDs require significantly less power than an HDD, so that mitigates
    the "power-saving" "advantage". When, as Rebecca alluded to, you factor in extending your SSD's lifespan, even by a relatively
    small percentage, the scale tips in favor of disabling hibernation.

    Also bear in mind that the Samsung 850 PRO 1TB has a feature called "device sleep", which accomplishes the same thing, but specific to that SSD. Turn off hibernation and make sure that "device sleep mode" is enabled on the Samsung 850 PRO.
     
  4. renosablast

    renosablast Moderator Staff Member

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    And welcome along, RebeccaRX!

    Jump right in and post often!

    I cannot take credit for the Optimization Guide, but I snuck a piece of that pizza and it was mighty tasty!

    Thanks on behalf of all of us.
     
  5. Seán

    Seán Member

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    In my opinion, I would suggest only turning it off if you don't plan ever putting Windows into hibernation, particularly on a desktop PC where battery life is not an issue when the PC is in sleep mode. The only time I would suggest keeping hibernation enabled is if the PC is connected to a UPS. This way the UPS software can put the PC into hibernation during a power cut.

    On a laptop, I keep hibernation enabled on my laptop. This way I can keep applications open and continue working on them later without the powered RAM consuming battery runtime with the laptop in sleep mode. With hibernation on an SSD, the laptop powers up in just a few seconds, not much more than resuming from sleep.

    For those with a small SSD (e.g. 128GB or less), disabling hibernation can free up a substantial amount of space. For example, let's say an SSD has 120GB of usable capacity and the computer has 12GB of RAM, then the hibernation file gobbles up 10% of the SSD's capacity which is a considerable chunk.
     
  6. tsw62

    tsw62 New Member

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    Thanks to you all for the feedback. The SSD I plan to buy for my new desktop pc (Asus X99 basis/i7-5820K/W8.1) will be a Samsung 850 Pro-version. Could be I even buy two of them, a 512GB for Windows and some applicatons and a 1TB where I store large size files, such as video and VM's. I intend to keep free space of at least 20%.
    Assume in this scenario hibernation could as well switched off.

    Thanks again!
    =
     
  7. Sean Webster

    Sean Webster Das Schweebie Staff Member

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    If you want to utilize Windows 8 and its fast boot feature. You do not want to disable hibernation as it is used for this particular feature to speed up the systems boot time.
     
  8. Akshat

    Akshat New Member

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    I am a desktop user and i have personally disabled and removed hibernation file from Windows 10. It has free up about 7GB of space on my SSD which i think is pretty great.
     
  9. Pendaws

    Pendaws New Member

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    I don't have use for the hibernation function and disable it on every build I make. My current machine boots in approx 10 seconds so, I see no value at all in having it.
     

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