Super Talent Announces USB 3.0 Express Dram*Disk – Up To 4041 MB/s Seq. Reads And Up To 5388 MB/s Seq. Writes

Super Talent Technology, a leading producer of NAND flash storage devices, is announcing the USB 3.0 Express Dram*Disk. The USB 3.0 Express Dram*Disk and its proprietary built-in software (included) utilize your computer’s available RAM to transfer files at blazing speeds – up to 4041 MB/s sequential reads and up to 5388 MB/s sequential writes.

SuperTalent banner 2Available in capacities up to 64GB, this unique USB drive also moves files while you are using the program, reducing subsequent wait times. The USB 3.0 Express Dram*Disk is a productivity boon for creative professionals, who often find themselves constantly moving files while on the go, and this innovative flash drive is able to cut these times dramatically, as it can be many times faster than even an SSD.

SuperTalent DRAM disk horizontal 3Super Talent’s USB 3.0 Express Dram*Disk and its pre-installed software are able to be used with multiple devices and computers at any given time. This enables users to be able to take their work with them, and run large programs on other devices. For those who have upgraded their host systems with more RAM, the USB 3.0 Express Dram*Disk is even more useful when it has more RAM to work with. For users running large programs, such as Adobe Photoshop, Maya, CAD and more, this latest specialty USB drive from Super Talent is ideal.

SuperTalent DramDisk comparisonThe USB 3.0 Express Dram*Disk is just as portable as any other USB flash drive, while its incredible transfer speeds make it a productivity power house. Pricing and availability have not yet been announced. You can view the USB 3.0 Express Dram*Disk product page here; and you can view the Super Talent press release announcing it in its entirety here.

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boogerlad
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boogerlad

I don’t understand. Having a software ramdisk to speed up transfers? This makes the operation appear to finish quickly, but if I need to unplug it, the data is not on the flash drive itself. What a useless gimmick.

Benjamin Hojnik
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Benjamin Hojnik

Exactly. This just screams of lost data.

????
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????

why usb 3.0 have 5Gb Bandwidth.
But it performance has 5388 MB/s

Benjamin Hojnik
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Benjamin Hojnik

Fine print.

Vlad Bieg
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Vlad Bieg

“up to”, not sustained.

????
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????

USB 3.0 5Gb Bandwidth .
5Gb , the max limit is 4GB
how to “up to ” 5.338 GB?

Danny
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Danny

seriously how is this even featured here…. this is a useless product that completely ignores it’s main purpose

Fred
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Fred

Take a look at the linked press release. This is just a cut & paste with minor edits of that with pretty pictures but no added value. It’s kind of sad really.

Vlad Bieg
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Vlad Bieg

Useless product, gimmick… meanwhile, behind your back, just about every part of your computer uses “useless” concept of caching to speed things up.

Vlad Bieg
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Vlad Bieg

People who have problems understanding what it does (yet are happy to comment): please read a bit about caching: just about every part of your computer is using this mechanism extensively (CPU, GPU, HDD/SDD, etc). Caching concept is not a gimmick.

Benjamin Hojnik
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Benjamin Hojnik

Caching is all fine and dandy right up to a point, when you deal with removable media.

When you have removable media, you cannot affoard to keep data in some cache, especially volatile like dram or sram.

This (and cost obviously) is the reason why flash drives dont have any dram cache, while ssds mostly do.

Vlad Bieg
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Vlad Bieg

All external disks (mechanical and SSDs based, old and new designs) use caching. Yes, pulling out removable media before it completes the operation, without proper ejecting it, is (and always was) not advisable. Nothing conceptually new here, really.

boogerlad
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boogerlad

Let’s say with this flash drive, a 5gb file can be “written” to it in 1 second. Then I want to safely eject. The operating system will either say the disk is in use, take a very long time to unmount, or some other undefined behavior. This will confuse the user. The operating system’s built in caching is probably more effective than this.

Benjamin Hojnik
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Benjamin Hojnik

They mostly cache mapping tables.

Very little actual user data is cached.

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